Urine Drug Testing is the Law in some States

 

Pain is the most common reason for medical care in the USA with 32.8% of population experiencing persistent or chronic pain symptoms.


Everyday 46 people die from an overdose of prescription pain killers in the U.S. This surpasses deaths from heroin and cocaine combined;(CDC). In 2017, there were 70,237 drug overdose deaths in the United States (192 deaths a day; an 9.6% increase from 2016).

The CDC recommends all patients on long-term opioid therapy should have periodic urine drug tests (UDT). Medical experts agree that an annual UDT for all patients should be standard practice. Subsequent UDTs should be determined on an individual patient basis, at the discretion of the clinician.


Pain Management Clinic Acts”: As of August 2014, nine States (Florida, Texas, Georgia, Kentucky, Louisiana, Mississippi, Ohio, Tennessee,and West Virginia) have passed laws that have mandated that patients who have been prescribed narcotic medication for chronic and acute conditions, participate in mandatory urine drug testing on a routine basis not only for compliance but also for detection of potential abuses and illicit drugs.

 

Florida has passed laws "Pain Management Clinic Act" that have mandated that patients who have been prescribed narcotic medication for chronic and acute conditions, participate in mandatory urine drug testing on a routine basis not only for compliance but also for detection of potential abuses and illicit drugs.

 

In total, ten States have passed legislation regarding drug testing or screening for public assistance applicants or recipients (Arizona, Florida, Georgia, Kansas, Mississippi, Missouri, North Carolina, Oklahoma, Tennessee and Utah).

 

OTHER SECTIONS UNDER WHY UDT?

The Need for UDT

How UDT Screen Works

The Science of Urine

UDT Methods

Process of UDT

Commonly Abused Drugs

UDT Law in Florida